News: 2021

February

Interview with Dan Hooper “What happened at the big bang?”, New Scientist

February 5, 2021

For Dan Hooper, head of theoretical astrophysics at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Chicago, solving these questions involves radically rethinking what we think we know about the universe’s very early history.
Interviewed by Richard Webb, Executive Editor, New Scientist at the Royal Institution, London in Feb 2020.


Joshua Frieman named Fellow of the American Astronomical Society

February 5, 2021

Citation: "Joshua Frieman (Fermilab / University of Chicago): For significant theoretical work on inflationary cosmology and dark energy and for pioneering contributions to optical survey science."


January

NASA selects PUEO to Study Universe’s Secrets

January 11, 2021

PUEO is a balloon mission designed to launch from Antarctica that will detect signals from ultra-high energy neutrinos, particles that contain valuable clues about the highest energy astrophysical processes, including the creation of black holes and neutron star mergers. Neutrinos travel across the universe undisturbed, carrying information about events billions of light years away. PUEO would be the most sensitive survey of cosmic ultra-high energy neutrinos ever conducted. The principal investigator is Abigail Vieregg of the University of Chicago.


Joel Fuentes was selected as 2020–21 Radix Trading Fellow

January 5, 2021

His work involves exploiting superheated liquid techniques in sensitive bubble chambers for direct dark matter detection experiments.


Ti-Lin Chou was selected as 2020–21 Radix Trading Fellow

January 5, 2021

He studies cosmology, where he analyzes the faint microwave signal coming from the beginning of our universe to help answer questions in fundamental physics.


Gourav Khullar was selected as 2020–21 Radix Trading Fellow

January 5, 2021

As a sixth year PhD candidate in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Gourav studies the formation and evolution of galaxies in distant galaxy clusters, using data from ground- and space-based telescopes.


“Ripples in space-time could provide clues to missing components of the universe”, UChicago News

January 1, 2021

UChicago scientist lays out how LIGO gravitational waves could be scrambled, yielding information.
“Gravitational waves are the perfect messenger to see these possible modifications of gravity, if they exist.”—Astrophysicist Jose María Ezquiaga